Ron Huxley's DIY Parent

Ron Huxley is an artist, family therapist, father of four and grandparent of two (so far)...Check out some other blogs by Ron:

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handmadeheart:

Trying to jazz up our IKEA kitchen. We made a washing machine out of an old CD box. Small things.

Happy Easter! He is Risen!

Happy Easter! He is Risen!

harpercollinschildrens:

Whether it’s dyed eggs, decorative baskets or extravagant hats; Easter has always been one of the craftiest holidays. Egg dying is definitely one of our favorites, but this year we wanted to take it up a notch and pair creative Easter egg designs with Children’s Easter books.

We know it’s going…

Paper plate Easter basket craft
To make our Easter baskets we used paper plates (two per child), paint, scissors and something to stick the basket together: either staples, sticky tape or glue. Adding white to our usual craft paints gave us a pretty selection of pastel Easter colours.
Each child painted their own design on to the ‘wrong’ side of the paper plate.  This side takes the paint better than the waxed side, and the curve of the plate works better when you fold it from this side.
You can paint any design you like, from a pretty pattern…

spring flowers…
or a meadow. Have a think about how the basket will look when it’s folded, and you can paint the underneath and sides of your plate to reveal a scene when it’s folded.
Once the paint is dry, you need to cut and fold your paper plate to make the basket. Use a ruler and pencil to draw a cross that meets in the centre of your plate.

You need to mark a section on each of the four radiuses to show you where to cut your lines – see the photo below as a guide. Our paper plate measured 23cm in diameter and we made each cutting line 7.5cm long.

I’ve used a marker pen here to make the lines easier for you to see, but I’d suggest you use a faint pencil line, so you won’t see it when you fold up the basket. Snip along each of the four cutting lines.

Then fold up your paper plate, as show below. Each quarter of the plate overlaps its neighbour to give you a basket shape. You can fasten this in place using staples, sticky tape or glue – depending on how neat and quick you want the finished basket to be.
Use a second paper plate to make a handle. Cut off half of the rim to give you an arch, and faster it at either side to your basket – again, using staples, tape or glue to suit.
Aren’t they pretty? They’re really simple for children to make, and I love each child’s Easter basket will have their own unique art work on.  You can add a little ribbon bow as a final flourish, and fill them with tissue paper and Easter treats.

More Easter crafts and games

If you like this paper plate Easter basket craft and would like some more spring ideas, take a look at these fun Easter egg games – you can use your basket to play them!

Paper plate Easter basket craft

To make our Easter baskets we used paper plates (two per child), paint, scissors and something to stick the basket together: either staples, sticky tape or glue. Adding white to our usual craft paints gave us a pretty selection of pastel Easter colours.

easter craftEach child painted their own design on to the ‘wrong’ side of the paper plate.  This side takes the paint better than the waxed side, and the curve of the plate works better when you fold it from this side.

Easter paper plate craftYou can paint any design you like, from a pretty pattern…

paper plate craft basket

spring flowers…

easter paper plate flowers craftor a meadow. Have a think about how the basket will look when it’s folded, and you can paint the underneath and sides of your plate to reveal a scene when it’s folded.

paper plate craft spring Once the paint is dry, you need to cut and fold your paper plate to make the basket. Use a ruler and pencil to draw a cross that meets in the centre of your plate.

paper plate gift bag craft

You need to mark a section on each of the four radiuses to show you where to cut your lines – see the photo below as a guide. Our paper plate measured 23cm in diameter and we made each cutting line 7.5cm long.

how to make an easter basket

I’ve used a marker pen here to make the lines easier for you to see, but I’d suggest you use a faint pencil line, so you won’t see it when you fold up the basket. Snip along each of the four cutting lines.

how to make a paper plate basket

Then fold up your paper plate, as show below. Each quarter of the plate overlaps its neighbour to give you a basket shape. You can fasten this in place using staples, sticky tape or glue – depending on how neat and quick you want the finished basket to be.

turn paper plate into bowlUse a second paper plate to make a handle. Cut off half of the rim to give you an arch, and faster it at either side to your basket – again, using staples, tape or glue to suit.

Easter basket craft using paper plateAren’t they pretty? They’re really simple for children to make, and I love each child’s Easter basket will have their own unique art work on.  You can add a little ribbon bow as a final flourish, and fill them with tissue paper and Easter treats.

homemade Easter basket craft

More Easter crafts and games

If you like this paper plate Easter basket craft and would like some more spring ideas, take a look at these fun Easter egg games – you can use your basket to play them!

createforless:

Indigo Dyed Eggs via Tuts+

Using indigo to dye eggs creates a gorgeous shibori look.

Spring Art Projects for Kids - DIYParent.Tumblr.com

(via Fine Lines: A Few More Buttons)

craftjunkie:

Plantable Felt Garden {Tutorial}

Found at: abeautifulmess

craftjunkie:

Garden Rocks {Tutorial}

Found at: cutesycrafts

creativesocialworker:

St. Patrick’s Day Activities: I got an a request for some suggestions for holiday themes activities so I made up a few. 

  • Lucky Clover: Print the clover worksheet above on green construction paper or card stock.  The client completes the work sheet (essentially “the miracle questions”) and then on the back creates a drawing/collage/etc. depicting what in their life makes them feel lucky (photo source)
  • CBT Worksheet: I edited one of my thinking traps worksheet to fit with the theme.  Make sure clients are aware this activity is just for fun and leprechauns aren’t really to blame.
  • Pot of Gold Activity: I put chocolate gold coins and purple and green plastic coins in a bag.  They would pick one coin out at a time and there was a color code directing them what to do.
  • Hunt for Gold: You could create a team-building/problem solving scavenger hunt, ending at a “pot of gold” (this could lead into the previous pot of gold activity)  This would be great for a social skills group.
  • Bingo: Here is a free printable bingo sheet that you could do something with using a code.

*Photo is not of a client.  Click here for photo source*